Gulf Coast Recovery

Appleseed seeks to ensure that public schools are vibrant, safe, stimulating and diverse places where all students have an opportunity to learn. The network’s programs in education aim to engage parents in building better schools, ensure that resources are distributed equitably among schools, and that schools comply with laws aimed at ensuring opportunities for all, especially the most vulnerable: poor children, minorities, targets of bullying, English language learners, and students with disabilities. Our broader programming for vulnerable youth is directed towards foster children and former foster children, immigrant children, and homeless children.

Gulf Coast Recovery

The aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita further exposed the deep-rooted social issues of marginalization and poverty — legacies which continue to reveal structural inadequacies that impede justice and equal opportunity. Using our report, A Continuing Storm: The On-Going Struggles of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees, as a guide, Appleseed engages in projects that facilitate recovery, proposing solutions to many of the problems that continue to surface years after these storms. Our recommendations hold the promise of long-lasting impact which will result in reduced vulnerability for families and communities following a disaster.

Appleseed engages in broad areas of natural disaster-related policy change that include low-income housing, disaster response law (Stafford Act), FEMA-HUD shared housing responsibilities, Fair Housing law enforcement, Community Development Block Grant implementation and oversight and faulty federal and state rebuilding policies. Anonymous donor support leveraged with the pro bono talents of the Appleseed network allowed Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas Appleseed Centers to continue this national and state-based Gulf Coast Recovery Work.